Articles for Translation industry

The key role of translation in ensuring that life-saving Covid-19 information reaches minority language communities within countries

Pisana Ferrari – cApStAn Ambassador to the Global Village Never before has translation been as important as during the current coronavirus pandemic. Understanding relevant medical terms is vital at all times but all the more so during a global health crisis, where compliance to containment measures is critical in order ...

Skirting online censorship in China by “translating” a banned article into Morse, hexadecimal code, emoji and elvish language

Pisana Ferrari - cApStAn Ambassador to the Global Village People across China have been very creative in past weeks in finding ways to get around the ban on an article that was critical of how the government handled the coronavirus epidemic. The article, written by Ai Fen, director of the ...

On how a 1801 Ottoman Empire edict and its translated English version changed the fate of the Parthenon marbles forever

by Pisana Ferrari - cApStAn Ambassador to the Global Village Was the removal of the Parthenon Marbles by Lord Elgin, who brought them to Britain in the early 19th century, "legal"? A leaked draft of EU paper stirs Parthenon marbles dispute, reads a recent article in the Art Newspaper. The EU ...

Dubbing or subtitles, which is better? An age-old debate has come back to the forefront with the Oscar win for “Parasite”

Published in: Translation industry

by Pisana Ferrari - cApStAn Ambassador to the Global Village Subtitles translate a film's dialogue into a written text superimposed on the screen, allowing viewers to read along while following the actors as they speak in their native language. Dubbing consists of translating and lip-syncing the original audiovisual text, where ...

Does the translator’s gender influence the interpretation of a text? What happens when women translate classics?

Published in: Translation industry

by Pisana Ferrari - cApStAn Ambassador to the Global Village   Translating the Classics was for centuries "men's work", writes US academic, historian and writer Erika Harlitz-Kern, in a recent article for The Week. (1) Historically, women were expected to translate the works of their contemporaries - considered less important. According to ...

Should we use “translate” as a noun? A case of “nominalisation” of a verb

by Pisana Ferrari – cApStAn Ambassador to the Global Village   The conversion of verbs into nouns is called "nominalisation" (the opposite, turning nouns into verbs, is called "verbing" or "denominalisation"). There are two types of nominalisation. The first involves adding a suffix: the verb "to investigate" produces the noun "investigation." The ...